Signs and Risk Factors of Infertility

Signs and Risk Factors of Infertility

Brittni Devlin |Mar 30, 2021

The journey of pregnancy is one many couples look forward to. Unfortunately, an event that is supposed to be joyous and exciting is often filled with frustration and complications. Struggling to get pregnant is perfectly normal. However, when problems persist after a long time of trying, it may be time to start considering the possibility of infertility. Here we will take a look at infertility symptoms and the risk factors.

What is Infertility?

Infertility refers to when individuals struggle with getting pregnant. Your case is considered an event of infertility when you’ve failed to become pregnant after a year of frequent, unprotected sex. Although it is often portrayed as an issue involving deficits in the female reproductive system, both males and females can experience infertility symptoms when a couple is trying to conceive.

Struggling with infertility symptoms does not mean that a couple can’t become pregnant. Learning more about what infertility means and what to do about it is a great first step towards overcoming your obstacles.

Male vs Female Infertility

Anyone can suffer from infertility problems. While a doctor’s examination is necessary to pinpoint the reason behind it, there are a few common reasons why a couple struggles getting pregnant.

Common reasons for male infertility:

Sperm Production Dysfunction

Abnormalities in sperm production are a leading cause of male fertility problems. These issues may arise from physiological problems, such as undescended testicles, developmental defects, or diseases. Infections, such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, HIV, or mumps, sometimes compromise sperm quality. Other general health problems, such as diabetes, may hinder your ability to produce enough sperm.

Sperm Delivery Abnormalities

Having enough sperm won’t get a partner pregnant if the sperm cannot be delivered. Several different physiological phenomena may impede one’s ability to ejaculate properly. Structural abnormalities, such as blockage to the testicle, may cause this. Premature ejaculation may also be a contributing factor if it impedes an individual’s ability to impregnate their partner.

Reproductive Damage

While structural blocks may be due to genetic defects, disease and injury may cause these problems. Physical trauma or injury to the reproductive system may impede one’s infertility. Several environmental factors may contribute to this damage. Undergoing radiation or chemotherapy treatments may cause these issues. Other issues may come from smoking cigarettes, alcohol, steroids, and medication. Exposure to high heat, such as frequent hot tub use, may also impact sperm production.

Common reasons for female infertility:

Ovulation Disorders

Ovulation refers to the time in a woman’s reproductive cycle when her ovary releases an egg for fertilization. If she is unable to release an egg, she won’t be able to get pregnant. Problems can be due to hormonal disorders (such as polycystic ovary syndrome) or other hormonal imbalances that mess up a healthy menstrual cycle.

Uterine or Cervical Problems

If there are structural abnormalities (such as in the shape of the uterus) or polyp development, it may impede one’s ability to get pregnant.

Fallopian Tube Abnormalities

If the fallopian tubes are damaged or blocked, it may be more difficult for an individual to conceive.

Health Conditions

Different diseases and health conditions may cause damage to the reproductive system. Conditions like endometriosis are often linked with infertility problems. Primary ovarian insufficiency, also known as early menopause, causes women to cease menstruation earlier than average. Early menopause is often correlated with genetic diseases, immune system abnormalities, and previous cancer treatment.

Pelvic Dysfunction

Following injury or surgery, scar tissue in the pelvic region may make it difficult for some men and women to get pregnant.

Infertility Treatments

There are several different treatments a fertility specialist may recommend to encourage pregnancy. These treatments may be simple things such as lifestyle changes or tracking one’s cycle in order to enhance the chances of conception.

For more complicated situations, individuals may need to seek hormonal interventions or undergo further procedures to facilitate pregnancy. These involve medical supervision.

How to Receive Help for Infertility Problems

If you and your partner are struggling to get pregnant, it’s a good idea to reach out to a fertility clinic. A thorough physical examination is necessary to determine the exact cause and how it can be treated. Trained physicians can help you determine the underlying causes of your infertility and find the treatments that work best for you.

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Elizabeth Dickson | March 30, 2021

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Krista Bugden | March 30, 2021

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Angina vs. Heart Attack: 5 Similarities and Differences

Pamela Bandelaria | March 30, 2021

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Similarity: Symptom Presentation Angina and heart attacks are similar in their presentation. People who experience these usually present with chest pain. The type of chest pain can be the same. People with angina or heart attack usually describe their chest pain as a squeezing, stabbing or crushing type of pain. Sometimes the pain can radiate or extend to other areas of the body, such as in the shoulder or arms, jaw and neck, abdomen or back. There can also be an accompanying difficulty of breathing or a feeling of fatigue. Because of this, people think that angina is a heart attack. 2. Similarity: Causes The cause of angina and heart attacks can be similar as well. Angina and heart attacks can be due to blockage of the heart vessels due to increased cholesterol levels or blood clots, which cause physical blockage or high blood pressure that leads to muscle thickening, leading to narrowing of the blood vessel cavity. 3. Similarity: Risk Factors Risk factors for angina and heart attacks are also similar, including: High cholesterol levels. Persistently high or poorly controlled blood pressure. Smoking. Diabetes. Obesity. Poor lifestyle (sedentary activity, poor diet). Family history of heart disease. It is safe to say that in order to avoid angina vs. heart attack, you should minimize having these risks, especially avoiding those that are within your control. 4. Difference: Condition Classification Although angina and a heart attack have their similarities, they differ greatly in many ways. Angina is a symptom and usually pertains to an underlying coronary heart disease, while a heart attack or myocardial infarction is a disease in itself. 5. Difference: Severity Angina, especially stable angina, only occurs during physical exertion or in the presence of other factors. 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