8 Signs of a Yeast Infection

8 Signs of a Yeast Infection

Tooba Pasha Waqar |Apr 8, 2021

What Are the Symptoms of a Yeast Infection?

Knowing that you have a yeast infection may sound a little gross, but it’s not as bad or concerning as you may think.

Yeast infections are relatively common in men and women, although women bear the brunt of it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that three in every four women get a yeast infection at least once in their life.

However, most only realize they have it once it is diagnosed. If you are worried you might have a yeast infection, you must learn the causes and symptoms. That way, you can find a way to mitigate your chances of ever having yeast infection again.

It’s a common fact that every vagina has bacteria and yeast cells. While these cells and bacteria do remain balanced, an increase in the yeast cells leads to the vagina experiencing a yeast infection.

The bacteria present in the vagina is known as lactobacillus, whereas the fungus or yeast cells are called candida. The bacteria typically keep the yeast cells in check, but an imbalance in a person’s system leads to the bacteria working ineffectively. That, in turn, leads to an increase of yeast, which causes the symptoms to develop.

The Causes of a Yeast Infection

Unfortunately, multiple reasons can lead to a yeast infection, such as:

  • Stress
  • Lack of sleep
  • Hormonal imbalance, especially if you are near your menstrual cycle date
  • Bad eating habits, such as eating sugary drinks
  • Uncontrolled diabetes
  • Weak immune system
  • Pregnancy
  • Antibiotics (some can decrease the number of good bacteria in your vagina)

The most common type of yeast infections that occur are Candidiasis and Candida albicans. Thankfully, both are easily treatable and require essential medication. However, for women with recurring yeast infections, these may not be the specific infections causing problems. You will need a doctor’s appointment and a lab test to determine which infection you have.

What are the Symptoms of a Yeast Infection?

Vaginal yeast infections share a common selection of symptoms. These include:

  • Swelling around the vagina
  • Itchiness in the vulva folds
  • Burning sensation during sex or urination
  • Painful sex
  • Redness
  • Soreness
  • Rash-like patches on the vulva folds
  • White, whitish-grey, or creamy, clumpy vaginal discharge

For the last symptom, the consistency could be watery, but the discharge may also be hard and sticky, so much that it may not be easy to remove. In that case, it’s best to leave the discharge as is and wash the area. You must be sure it is clean.

In some situations, you may also experience a complicated yeast infection. However, that occurs if you do not address the main problem early on.

You might experience symptoms such as itchiness, swelling, redness, and sores on the skin. But keep in mind that there are several types of yeast infections, and the symptoms may vary.

Yeast Infections in Men

Yeast infections among men are not as common as they are for women. But they do experience similar symptoms, including irritation, itching, redness, and discharge. For them, the infection will affect the head of their penis.

Please note that yeast infections are more common among men who are not circumcised, and those who have an overgrowth of yeast on their skin. But, men can also get yeast infections if their partner has a yeast infection as well.

Is a Yeast Infection an STI?

Considering that one can transmit a yeast infection through sex, you may wonder whether that marks it as an STI or sexually transmitted infection.

But, the chances of one person getting it from an infected person are slim. And since yeast infections are not typically caused through sexual activity, they do not count as STIs.

When Should I See a Doctor?

If the symptoms mentioned above are similar to what you’re experiencing, you may have a yeast infection. To get it treated, you will need to visit the doctor.

And while you will be tempted to try any at-home remedies, don’t. Home remedies such as applying yogurt to the infected area and others have had no scientific backing. If you want to be treated correctly, you will need a doctor’s prescription.

After a pelvic exam and lab test, your doctor will know whether to diagnose a yeast infection. If they do, they will prescribe a topical antifungal medication and prescribe medicine like fluconazole, which you’ll need to take by mouth.

The infection should go away within a week, but if it doesn’t, you will need to follow up with regular doses of your antifungal medication until the doctor is satisfied.

How to Prevent a Yeast Infection

There is no concrete solution to preventing a yeast infection, but there are certain things you can do to reduce the risk of getting one, such as:

  • Avoid tight pantyhose or underwear
  • Wear loose-fitting skirts and clothes
  • Wear cotton underwear and clothes made from natural fibers
  • Do not use fragranced tampons, deodorant pads, or feminine deodorants
  • Eat a healthy diet
  • Avoid using hot baths or hot tubs
  • Change out of wet clothing such as swimsuits promptly once you’ve been in the water
  • Do not douche

Closing Thoughts

In general, yeast infections are not dangerous, but they can make life uncomfortable for a while. Avoid the problem by taking good care of your body and getting medical help if you think you have an infection.
With any luck, this will be the only time you’ll have to worry about getting a yeast infection in your whole life.

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Is An Epsom Salt Bath Good for UTIs?

Pamela Bandelaria | April 8, 2021

A Soak Could Help You Find Some Relief Urinary tract infections are one of the most common outpatient consultations in the United States. They are one of the most common causes of fever in the young and elderly and can cause urinary incontinence in women. Yearly, around 250,000 cases of kidney infections or pyelonephritis occur among women in the United States. Costs for the diagnosis and management of urinary tract infections in the United States can reach up to a total of $2-3 billion dollars a year. It might seem like a simple infection, but it can be really costly when you think of it from that scale. It is an essential infection to treat because it can lead to serious complications such as sepsis and renal damage if left untreated. That is why a lot of other remedies are being tested to see if they can alleviate symptoms of urinary tract infections. This article will discuss how Epsom salt baths are good for UTIs, what benefits Epsom salt baths have, and how to prepare an Epsom salt bath. What are Urinary Tract Infections? What are the Symptoms? Urinary tract infections are infections of the parts that serve as the passageway of the urine out of our bodies; this includes the kidney, bladder, ureters, and urethra. Urine is a sterile substance that passes out of our bodies; therefore, the introduction of bacteria can lead to a bladder infection, inflammation, and pus formation that can lead to various symptoms. Symptoms of a urinary tract infection include pain and burning sensation while urinating, cloudy or foul-smelling urine, blood in the urine, and abdominal pain. What are Epsom Salts? What Do They Do? Epsom salt or magnesium sulfate is a white, crystalline water-soluble chemical compound that has been used for centuries to treat various illnesses. Epsom salts are commonly used to relieve sore muscles, stiff joints, itching, skin irritation, and sunburn and are used as relief for headaches or foot pain. Its uses in the human body are varied, and it has been found to provide relief for various ailments, which include urinary tract infections. How is an Epsom Salt Bath Good for UTIs? What Benefits do Epsom Salt Baths Have? Epsom salts provide several benefits for treating urinary tract infections. The primary benefit of using Epsom salt baths for bladder infections or urinary tract infections is to relieve pain. Epsom salt baths can help relieve pain and discomfort associated with UTIs. UTIs present with a burning sensation, pain while urinating, and cloudy urine. The warm, calming nature of Epsom salt baths has been shown to help relieve this. [youmaylike] If you soak in an Epsom salt bath, it can be helpful to reduce inflammation as well. Because they are rich in magnesium, they can help cleanse the urinary tract and aid in the healing process. The increased concentration of magnesium sulfate is believed to help change the environment in the urinary tract, which can lead to conditions unfavorable for bacteria to grow. It can help prevent bacteria from growing or multiplying when you soak in an Epsom salt bath and has a disinfectant property. Epsom salt baths can also improve the circulation of blood in the body. It can cause dilation of the blood vessels leading to improved blood flow, which also promotes the passage of cells that help in the body’s immunity. Epsom salt baths provide an overall relaxing and calming experience that can leave you feeling detoxified as well. Are Epsom Salt Baths the Answer to UTIs? Although Epsom salt baths may relieve urinary tract infection symptoms, there is not enough evidence to recommend using Epsom salts over established treatments like antibiotics. 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Further, you should seek medical attention if you are experiencing any serious side effects from using Epsom salt baths. There are no studies that show that using an Epsom salt bath for UTIs will prevent or cure a urinary tract infection, so it is still important to go to the doctor for proper management. Talk to your doctor if you are experiencing symptoms of a urinary tract infection.

Follow These 8 Tips to Prevent Balding

Elizabeth Dickson | April 8, 2021

How to Prevent Balding If balding or thinning hair is one of your worries, we have got the solutions for you. In this article, we will chat about the symptoms of balding, the causes, how to prevent balding and how to cope with hair loss. Losing a few strands of hair every day is completely normal, but what do you do when you begin losing more hair than you should? According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), 80 million people in America have hereditary hair loss (alopecia). In addition, according to the American Hair Loss Association (AHLA), approximately 25% of men who have hereditary male pattern baldness start losing their hair before the age of 21. By the age of 50, about 85% of men are bald or have significantly thinner hair. 8 Ways to Prevent Balding If genetics is the reason for your hair loss, there might not be a lot that can be done to prevent it. However, these tips can help slow down or prevent loss if other reasons are causing it: Treat your hair gently and avoid pulling; use caution when washing, brushing and styling your hair. Avoid harsh treatments, such as coloring and perms. Protect your hair from the sun; wear a hat and avoid tanning beds. Quit smoking. Some studies suggest there is a link between balding and regular smoking. Eat a balanced diet rich in nutrients and antioxidants. Avoid hot showers and shampoo that causes scalp irritation. Talk to your doctor or dietician about supplements that may help slow down your hair loss. If you are getting treatments for cancer or taking a medication that causes hair loss as a side effect, speak to your doctor about getting a cold cap or other measures to prevent hair loss. If you try the above tactics and still feel that hair loss is negatively impacting your life, it is important to seek out medical advice. First, talk to your doctor about prescription or over-the-counter treatments for hair loss. Your doctor may refer you to a dermatologist who specializes in hair loss. Hair Loss Symptoms Hair loss can look different from person to person, depending on the severity and cause. However, here are some common symptoms to watch for. Slow and Consistent Loss of Hair Starting at the Top of the Head This is the most common form of hair loss. As you age, you can experience thinning of the hair on the top of your head, especially men. In men, this typically looks like a receding hairline or thinning hair or a thinning patch on top of the head. In women, this typically looks like the widening of the part of the hair, along with loss of hair around the forehead. Sudden Loss of Hair It's as if it has become loose from your scalp. Our bodies are extremely sensitive to changes and will work hard to cope with those changes. Therefore, environmental and emotional stress can cause you to lose handfuls of hair at a time. Thankfully, this type of hair loss is typically temporary and will stop once the stressors have been addressed. [youmaylike] Patches of Hair Loss All Over the Scalp With this type of hair loss, hair consistently falls out from the same spot on your scalp. This leaves your scalp with patches or circular spots of missing hair. Not only can this affect the hair on your head, but it can also leave patches of missing hair on your face, such as in your beard or eyebrows. Loss of Both Scalp and Body Hair This type of hair loss is less common than the others. It typically only affects individuals who are taking a strong medication or treatment, such as chemotherapy. The lost hair generally regrows with ease once the treatment has stopped. Causes of Hair Loss There are several reasons why you may experience hair loss, including: Hereditary and genetic factors. Hormonal and systemic body changes. Certain medications and medical conditions. Mechanical stress, such as consistent pulling on the hair. Emotional and environmental factors. Radiation exposure. Some degree of hair loss is entirely normal. Typically, you lose between 50 to 100 strands of hair per day. New hair strands grow at about the same rate, meaning that hair loss isn't generally noticeable until you have exceeded this number.

Top 12 Foods, Supplements and Vitamins for Bariatric Surgery

Krista Bugden | April 8, 2021

Diet for Bariatric Surgery If you have tried everything within your power to lose weight or you have a health condition that prevents you from losing weight, your doctor may suggest bariatric surgery. Frequently called gastric bypass, this type of procedure often involves sealing off the top of the stomach, which decreases the amount of food you can consume and reduces nutrient absorption. As a result, it’s much easier to lose any excess weight. But what should a diet for bariatric surgery include and what can help you recover? In this article, we are going to explore all the foods, supplements and vitamins you might want to consider after your bariatric surgery. Let’s dive in! Post-Bariatric Surgery Diet Tips After bariatric surgery, you need to be cautious about what you consume. It’s recommended to: Drink at least 64 ounces of water each day. Delay drinking anything after a meal for 30 minutes. Eat slowly. Consume protein-rich foods. Avoid alcohol. Limit caffeine. Thoroughly chew each and every bite. Phase 1 Initially, you will be only allowed to consume liquids. This gives your stomach (and body) time to heal and recover. Some of these liquids may include: 1. Broth Broth is gentle and soothing on the digestive tract. In fact, it is frequently recommended for those with digestive issues due to its healing capabilities. Bone broth, in particular, contains protein and various minerals that help with your gut lining, ensuring you obtain adequate nutrition. 2. Unsweetened Juice Added sugars may irritate your stomach and digestive tract. Thus, choose unsweetened juices that naturally contain plenty of vitamins and minerals that can accelerate the healing and recovery process. You can also slowly suck on a popsicle or gelatin that is sugar-free. 3. Decaffeinated Tea or Coffee Caffeine should be avoided due to its stimulatory effects on the digestive system (which can mean you end up absorbing next to no nutrients from your food post-surgery). However, you can try decaffeinated varieties, receiving plenty of antioxidants and other nutrients. 4. Milk Milk can help you obtain adequate calcium and protein. Go for skim or 1% to avoid overloading your digestive system with too much fat. Phase 2 After a week of good tolerability of liquids, you will move on to pureed foods, making your diet a little more interesting! Typically, this means eating about three to six snacks or meals each day, with each meal taking about 30 minutes to consume. Here’s what this stage of the bariatric diet will include: 5. Pureed Fruits and Veggies Fruits and vegetables boost tons of nutrients that your body needs on a regular basis. They also come jam-packed with antioxidant and gut-friendly compounds, helping your digestive tract heal and get back on track post-surgery. 6. Pureed Lean Ground Meat While this might not sound ultra-appetizing, your body needs protein to heal and repair. Protein is the building block of the body, which means it is essential for improving your digestion as you recover. 7. Soft Scrambled Eggs Pureed foods further include soft scrambled eggs! Make sure not to overcook them, as this may make them tricky to eat. 8. Soups You can also enjoy various soups during this second week, allowing you to add variety to your daily diet. [youmaylike] Phase 3 and 4 From here, you can begin introducing soft foods, such as: Ground meat. Flaky fish. Cottage cheese. Rice. Cooked veggies. The following week, if all goes well, you can then introduce solid foods a little bit at a time. Supplements, Vitamins and Minerals Your doctor may further recommend certain supplements to guide your recovery and replace any foods you are unable to eat for the first few weeks. This is essential to prevent nutrient deficiencies and adverse health effects. Some supplements that you may be recommended include: 9. Calcium The intake of 1,200 milligrams to 2,000 milligrams of calcium can help prevent bone loss. This is especially important if you aren’t drinking milk (such as those that don’t tolerate lactose very well). 10. Vitamin D Vitamin D can be taken alongside calcium. It’s recommended to take 800 to 1,000 international units of vitamin D. Alternatively, you can also obtain vitamin D via the sun, which may mean your doctor can recommend sitting outside in the sun for 15 to 20 minutes each day. 11. Vitamin B12 B12 is an essential bariatric vitamin for energy production and is necessary for healing! It also may be hard to obtain initially when consuming only liquids since it is often found in meat and animal products. Aim for 500 micrograms daily. 12. Folic Acid and Iron Your doctor may further recommend folic acid or iron, especially if you are a woman who is currently menstruating. These are commonly lost via your monthly bleed. Yet, with restrictions around what you can eat, they may be hard to replenish, so supplementation may be best. Post-Bariatric Surgery Medications Post-bariatric surgery medications may include: Omeprazole. This prevents ulcers from developing. It is usually recommended to take within the first six months post-surgery. Ursodiol. This helps stop the production of gallstones, which commonly occur after this type of surgery. This medication is also typically taken for at least six months after bariatric surgery. Multivitamins. While technically not a medication, almost every person post-bariatric surgery will be recommended a multivitamin to take in order to prevent nutrient deficiencies, as the initial bariatric diet is quite restrictive. At the end of the day, it is important to follow your doctor’s orders and advice since they know you and your situation best.